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Rhino deaths spiral out of control!... A staggering high of 860 rhino were poached since the beginning of the year. Kruger National park has been hit the hardest where 521 of 860 were lost! In spite of the high number of rhino lost in Kruger National Park the authorities also had huge successes with counter poaching actions where poachers were killed and arrested. In some case even high calibre poaching rifles confiscated. This just in form SANParks face book page. South African National Parks 2...
Worsening Rhino war Strains Countries’ Relations


... The growing incursion of rhino poachers from Mozambique into South Africa’s flagship Kruger National Park is beginning to strain relations between the two countries. South African security operatives trying to stem the relentless killing of the enigmatic animals speak of it as a “border war”. They are getting increasingly fed-up with Mozambique’s security agencies for not doing more to clamp down on the poachers and the rhino-horn smugglers on their side of the boundary. Major General Johan Jooste, a veteran soldier...
Run 4 Rhino Potjiekos Kompetisie Reels / Competition Rules... Potjiekos Kompetisie Reëls / Competition Rules 1. 4 Mense per span / 4 Persons per team . 2. Alle voorbereiding (sny van groente, marinering van vleis, ens) moet op die terrein gedoen word. /All preparations (cutting of vegetables, marinating of meat, etc.) must be done on the terrain. 3. ‘n Lys van bestandele en die resepmetode moet beskikbaar wees vir die beoordelaars se inspeksie. / A list of ingredients as well as recipe must be there for the judges to...
Poaching Is Brutal Poaching is the illegal hunting of wild animals. Poachers are criminals as they break the law by hunting game illegally in Southern Africa. In order to do a legal hunt the rifle must be licensed and the person handling the rifle must be in possession of a competency certificate to do so. A license to hunt is purchased from the local wild life Authority and an ethical hunt is so conducted on an animal of which the numbers have...
To legalise or not to legalise?... (A version of this article was originally published in The Horn, autumn 2011. Author: Lucy Boddham-Whetham, former Deputy Director at Save the Rhino) In theory, a heavily controlled legalised trade in rhino horn could help meet the Asian demand for rhino horn and generate much-needed funds for conservation. In reality, there are many concerns about the viability of a legal trade its implications. I wanted to take a closer look at the debate. Those in favour of a legal trade argue that...
Ben Kruger doing it for the Rhino!... Ben Kruger’s  “So Good” Potjiekos Challenge supported by Crown National.   “One man, three charities, twelve hours and forty recipes” is the way in which Ben Kruger describes his new challenge. On 29 June he is going to attempt to make forty different recipes in just twelve hours without any help.   The challenge will happen at the Innibos Festival terrain and many of Ben’s friends form the music and entertainment industries are going to be there to provide...

Rhino killed in Mkhuze

  First 2014 rhino poaching death . ANDREW CORNEW | 9 January 2014 12:23 THE new year has barely started and already the first rhino killing has taken place in Zululand. An adult white rhino was found dead at uMkhuze Game Reserve on Tuesday after being shot and de-horned, reported Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife Communications Officer Musa Mntambo. ‘The rhino was executed about three days prior to the body being discovered,’ Mntambo said. Members of the SAPS Organised Crime Unit are investigating. The poaching of rhinos for their horns has reached unprecedented levels. While 10 years ago, a mere 25 rhinos were poached, the number poached in 2013 reached an unbelievable 946 in South Africa with 85 taking place in KZN. Mntambo did, however, confirmed 63 arrests were made in KZN last year with a total of 330...

Worsening Rhino war Strains Countries’ Relations


...

The growing incursion of rhino poachers from Mozambique into South Africa’s flagship Kruger National Park is beginning to strain relations between the two countries. South African security operatives trying to stem the relentless killing of the enigmatic animals speak of it as a “border war”. They are getting increasingly fed-up with Mozambique’s security agencies for not doing more to clamp down on the poachers and the rhino-horn smugglers on their side of the boundary. Major General Johan Jooste, a veteran soldier from southern Africa’s bush-war era who was appointed late last year to head up the military, police and game-ranger units fighting the poachers in the park, reverts to the military terms of “insurgency” and “counter-insurgency” to describe the situation. He says the rhino poaching is one of the worst crises in the more than a century of the park’s existence. 
South African National Parks (SANParks) chief executive David Mabunda has called it a “war situation”, with the   boundary between Kruger and Mozambique proving to be “the weakest line of defence against incursions”. With between 8,000 and 10,000 white rhinos and about a thousand black rhinos, Kruger National Park is home to the majority of South Africa’s estimated 18,000 white and 2,000 black rhino populations. At the rate that the animals are getting killed it is feared that both types, but in particular the more critically endangered black species, could be headed for extinction in a few decades’ time.
 Already 180 rhinos have been killed in the park since the beginning of the year, against a national total of 249. It is now feared the figure for 2013 could end up even exceeding last year’s horrendous toll of 668, of which Kruger Park accounted for 425. Poachers Killed in Fire Fights with Rangers According to SANParks, 30 of the 36 suspected poachers apprehended in Kruger Park so far this year turned out to be Mozambicans. Eleven of the 36 were killed in fire-fights with the security forces and the rest were arrested. The rising casualty rate bears out the extent to which it is starting to resemble a war situation. Jooste insists the basic purpose remains to arrest suspects, in line with the normal rules of law enforcement. But the poachers generally seem to have military training. They come heavily armed and are quite willing to engage in fire-fights. Unlike the park’s security personnel, they are not bound by any rules of engagement. And that, Jooste says, makes it an unequal and dangerous situation for the rangers. Further stacking the odds against the anti-poaching units is the vastness of the 20,000-square-kilometer (7,700-square-mile)...

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